Jellyfish Sting Inhibitors Put to the Test



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Posted by . on June 09, 2004 at 22:34:40:

Research was conducted to test the effectiveness of a jellyfish sting inhibitor. The inhibitor was tested against two different types of jellyfish: Chrysaora fuscescens and Chiropsalmus quadrumanus.

In the June issue of Wilderness and Environmental Medicine, an article was published outlining original research that was conducted to test the effectiveness of a jellyfish sting inhibitor. The inhibitor was tested against two different types of jellyfish: Chrysaora fuscescens and Chiropsalmus quadrumanus.

Each year, 150 million people are exposed to jellyfish that cause painful stings and several deaths. To combat the stings, a jellyfish inhibitor cream was introduced that allows for single application protection from both jellyfish stings and sunburn. However, no data has been published evaluating the cream’s effectiveness in preventing jellyfish stings, until now.

In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the jellyfish sting inhibitor, 24 healthy subjects were blindfolded and randomly assigned to receive the inhibitor on one forearm and conventional sunscreen on the other. The subjects were stung on the arm with jellyfish tentacles for 60 seconds and then redness and pain were measured at 15 minute intervals during a two hour period.

The C fuscescens jellyfish, also knows as sea nettles, are known for stinging swimmers in the Chesapeake Bay, along the Florida coast, and the West coast of the United States. Contact with a sea nettle’s tentacles causes immediate pain and may result in blisters. Although painful, stings from this particular jellyfish are not life threatening to humans.

However, the C quadrumanus, also known as the sea wasp or box jellyfish, causes more serious reactions including severe pain, redness, and swelling. This jellyfish is considered dangerous to humans and can be life-threatening to small children. The C quadrumanus is prevalent along the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida and Texas coastlines.

In the study, the sting inhibitor prevented sting symptoms of the C fuscescens jellyfish in a majority of the subjects. In the other group, the sting inhibitor also inhibited the more severe sting of the C quadrumanus in the majority of the subjects. While the inhibitor does not eliminate the sting from either jellyfish, it does diminish the frequency and severity of the stings.

Wilderness & Environmental Medicine is a peer-reviewed quarterly medical journal published by the Wilderness Medical Society. For more information, visit http://www.wms.org/

To view the article, visit: http://www.allenpress.com/pdf/weme_15_212_102_108.pdf


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